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Wysing Arts Centre
Wysing Arts Centre

Episode · 4 months ago

Desktop Studio Visits: Crystallmess

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Desktop Studio Visits are a new strand in our online events programme aimed at highlighting research from recent artists-in-residence and platforming new works in progress. 

For this event, Crystalmess (Christelle Oyiri-K) was joined by Wysing Curator and Acting Head of Programme John Eng Kiet Bloomfield to discuss a recent residency at Wysing. Using a number of artefacts from the residency as a framework for an informal chat, they touched on Christelle’s experimentation with sound synthesis and field recordings from a research trip to Guadeloupe and Martinique and work developing a new body of work exploring the intersection of anti-environmentalism, state secrecy and institutional racism. 

Content warning: this conversation includes discussion of racism, miscarriage, and rape.

Click here for a transcript of the event as a PDF in 14pt 1.5 line spacing. 

Click here for a transcript in .docx format. 

It seems green showing teeth because,okay, hello, everybody welcome to another episode of that Cop Studiovisits. My name is John and cabled, and I work at wising as a curator andacting head of program. So for this episode, I'm joined by the artist ChrisTilmas, who is calling in over seam from or San before I introduceChristemasse ill just quickly go over some housekeeping the event of beingsubtitled. You should be able to access a stream text, link the suption change,sizing and formatting, I think, can be found in the Chacon Ahorse wisingpodcast page some format of today's event and all of all events in theseries is that Cristel has chosen some artifacts from a recent residency.We're going to play, show or read them and we're going to talk about them.It's as simple as that, and then after about forty minutes or so there shouldbe some time of questions from the audience. If you have a question justpop it in the chat and if you don't that's fine, we all will have plan totalk about. I'm sure, then, if you'd like to read, is it theeven later on we're planning to Al Cabas, a video, a podcast and atranscript, and that should be out in the next week or so, and we also add all io descriptions ofvideos to the podcast. So I'm just going to introduce Cristosaid Christom, AK, Cristel or Yave is a multidisciplinary artist based in Parisif she is a sound altist and d j, as well as a performer. Her workhighlights forgotten, mythologies, the subtle interstices between memory andalienation, Tiy, culture and technology or work has been exhibited at lamentedLikati League Espeso, Actual K, bad basil, or to Italia an Overtaut Eastand London. So christel first came to wising in August last year, a fewmonths after a research trip to gradely in to talk about in a moment, so yeah welcome Christen. He Hi o I'm good just enjoying the time, but also working atthe same time, so not easy to keep the balance. Crean, that's one of us so just for access reasons, we're justgoing to describe ourselves. So I'm a mixed race, SIS man in his early thisI've got black glances black hair. I am a black woman in her late twentiesand I have like a lone. Can he held ponytail and African necklace and thecolor? Don't forget the goon ending without okay, so we will just play the firth clip them,which is from it's an extract o my talk that theacademic man comfrey none for heading on gave on anti coloniale come Gy, sowe'll play that in newer chantant, a man stands on a platform in front ofthe podium behind him as a screen showing an image of Noah's Ark withattacks to Noah, Ark, ecology or the double fracture, and it was inspired. It was a spin bout,some whites on the moon, so I want to give credit with ripe. Do I read one maestel quite on the bone Oas in of begins as well and white he's on the lone? I can't pay no Dr Bill, but what is onthe moon takes now I'll, be paying still a witis on the phone. You know an a night cause. It is on the one: No, a water,no tales, no life, but what is on the moon? I wonder why you hoping me to write iton the moon, who was already giving a fifty when or not what is on the Mon taxis. Taking my whole damn check thejunkies make me a neighbor's reckon to pray, O Mon is going up and as if all Icrept on in- U I rate my sister now were waiting on the one okay, so o of you knew that song, Iguess, but the key of these imaginator. Now asOrkesta we mentioned the world is in a ship. There is a canistoto world as aship and what type of ship are we going to build, and the question that israised in teas or story is who or what...

...would o o Bolini? Now, the song byguess with Er here, is making that comparison between those that have beenleft on the ground, while some have been allowed to go all the way to themoon and ball at space ship, and if you want to understand why,where did it come from the war? The fact that today we have created thesewhite spaces, where we can stick about the Colection and not even question theabsence of minorities and people pocos. We need to look at what I called it. The whole facture ofmorality. Now I want o sand is in French, but that's just it like that. You candivide about two moments: a pretty cool for it,but really taken stan since th s, one can be say: the Gosh covers roly and asdefine, but at our tackling what I call lot fracture. So we are activist, scholars and angelsare trying to reverse that Harrico I put a man abovenature, a losely as a a nature. That's the person who lameate here and again beside this basic form of ANARTA ISM over form of over Trienon, have tried to tackle both the Harrett man in nature and alsoissues of social justice issues of generality. So you consecutio, ecologyand son, so forth with what I did for in my studies isthat even the more leftist radical Pentica Decousus, the INGAS, have one shadow most of the time theyforget about of overlook racism and e n, the conal ofhistory of morality. So it seems that if you want to tackle the anometerfacture and even if you will tackle it for the radical way, you still can leftout this colo the cornal history of the world. Now on the Hodoi. Another movement is very critical ofhealty. That also gains things after the ANTIQUA protest on dependence in themidnite twenty centuries tackle the Como fracture, they wantedto reverse that Harek that put one colonist men above one COMIS wocalistmet and again this antico movement also have a more medical trains trying to,at the same time, reverse at the Araki, but also in false issues of Gendani, with over,like affoils or issues of social justice. ligious tors is also forth.However, all these movements, a lot of them, have list of let aside issues of cog the ECIL challenges of the world. Thank you. So that was MalcolmFerdinant, but good scientist and writer. His work argues thatenvironmental destruction is in ceptibly from relationships of racialand colonial domination, Cristo. Okay, you bad in so yeah. How could youtell us how you came to fedy non's work and why it wasimportant for your residency? I came across his work when, before I actually went to Geddo, I was increasing my interested into inRemi environmental issues and also like the the intersection betweenenvironmental issues and race issues, because I always felt likeblack people felt so removed from ecology just because they already havelike a lot under plate dealing with likeracial issues and gender issues as well. The offending back. It's like it doesn't really concern them,because also, this is a very like ecology has been so gentrie and solike Whiten, in the way that, like people feel disinterested in it,because it has been trivialized, if you're being honest like they don'tseethe bigger picture in, they don't...

...show included. So I was, I was looking for people and thinkers that were actuallyworking towards making the intersection between the two clearer and and making shading lights on different aspect ofecology that that I knew of, but that I couldn't really make sense of like, for instance, like what happened inFlint Michigan. I knew that it was a section between the two, but I because I I haven't studied ecologylike this is my background. I couldn't really make sense off of it. I reallyneed needed thinkers and books to really likeunderstand, because when we think about intersectional ty, most of the time wethink about the intersection between class race and gender, like the theactual, the actual ecosystem is often like. Put aside like it's been something thatis not really thought of in this aspect of things. So from me, when I was researching aboutthis topic, I came across this book, which is called the colonial ecology. I was looking for an article on cloudyCon, which is the best decide that I'm going to talk extensively about todayand when researching about this fast decide that would that was credit outin the French Caribbean. The French list in these island, like weather,open matching, which is where my maternal side comes from by searching. I came across one of his interviews. That was really reallyamazing because he taught about it talked about the chemistry of themaster, how the master is chemist, how the how we shouldn't separate slavery and ecology, because slaveryhad a tremendous effect on the nature, and I thought it was very brilliant. Iwas absolutely blown away and then I was like I mean I knew that, but likeit's one thing to know something, and it's another thing for someone toexplain to you exactly what happened when it seems like, I guess, a real pen,I think thinking about ecology through the Lens of race, feels a really reallyuseful for of for the current moment. Exactly I feel like it's, I feel likeit was I'm okay, we're talking about like Magro crake for Agression, N, etc,but it's also about like a bigger scale, and so so about like for me as someonethat is partially Caribbean, I couldn't really understand how such asmall island like Wede, Open Martinique, which is for people that don't knowbecause it's so small, like some people, might not even know where it is likeit's it's below hate and it's Velo like thewhat we called Big West indies, which is Ery Jamaica, because these are bigislands and so below the big islands. You have thesmall wist in these, which is where I come from, which is more like it's nextto barbadoes. Basically, it's not super far from Burbel and it's in its aboveSouth America, like it's a ball chain a so for me. I think that what really I struck me as well withhis work is that how we use the concept of unhoping in tropes to to to actually like how itchallenged this this concept, because this is a consent that a lot of like art, centers residency like this pastfive years, like everybody, was like, even in like open calls and stuff likethis in the home that has been used and overused in. He was basically like saying that this is a term that also like exclude,like the what it means to be an Interprutin en hopper sen is someonethat, like its acts upon nature like a fact,nature, and it's basically transforming nature into something that it's not inby by doing that, you use like the nuse industry, use, exportation capitalism,so one and so forth, and for me, it...

...didn't, like. I didn't feel, like myparents, for instance, were UN focus in because for me it's like how did theybenefit from that like? If someone has if they? If someone has a history oftheir family working for free for four hundred years, how could it be calledon hopes and because they didn't benefit directly for me? So it's no!It's not all humans. It's a you know some exactly I felt like it was. I feltlike I couldn't. I couldn't carry the guilt of being a non whopercent for like the last like forty years like it, it felt I felt like itwas a gilt that I couldn't really carry, but I was sorry I guess I fear is to bein for a sin. They sort of usually talk about the industrial revolution as thebig AFI. So that's that's like a weird blip, because it industrial revolutionis this moment when developed countries, sort of were polluting. Their own goesdebts before realizing that actually what they could do is extract, exploitand pollutes Havena, which is Colonis M and that kind of begins earlier. Sothat's exactly it's also where, like I felt like blinds like, I felt a little confused,because I was like way. I don't really relate to this, like maybe now, maybe maybe mygeneration may be me- I can relate to this with. I don't feel, like my parents, and the people that camefor me can relate to this definition because they haven't colonized orBenefitin. fitly benefited from colonialism at all. So this concept isnot the concept where I can set my history in you know, the benefits areunequal and the the effects are exactly exactly so. Itbasically reclaim this concept brake, creatingthe concept of niggaws for instant, for instance, which is like the same concept, but the C. Theconcept applied to black folks, for instance, like the Maroon runawayslave, that goes up into the heels because most of them, flavor orrunaways, go up in the eels, especially in Hedi, and that carry on the for station has no choice,but to do that, but that's a legal send because it's still like an expletion of nature,but it's for its survival in a framework of like slavery. So it's likereally really like now we're getting into something specific now I canactually relate, because it's not it's not like mistreating nature,because you want to you, want to extract profit, an and in power for me,it's because it's because of survival, what's happening in here right now,with all the fluting and and all the the catastrophe that has been going onfor decades over. There is largened by the fact that, like the maroons slaveslike differest, a like a huge part of the of the island, because when slaverywas over, they had to find jobs, and they had to also like supportthemselves and has a lot of people might not knowthat he die was the most. I think it was the island that was providingthe most like. It was the most financial financiallylike beneficial island in the Caribbean and even in the room of like slavery.It was very, very creative for France, so they would bring slave and insteadof like having them like living with their masters or living on theplantation like in the US, because we, the US, is more like cotton in petitwas more like relating to sugar. So it's like a hard shot, re culture.The life expected expectancy of a slave inthese times in the nineteenth century was two years, so it was the biggesttime over. That's also why, like patient people have like they look morelike African, like me, like they're, less mixed, because it was large onlylike a tenor. It's like this. The slave died. They bring all this lay fromAfrica. Then they died because they had no. It wasn't like in the US where theyhad like sort of like a life on the plantation. It's like they had no humancondition whatsoever like nothing was made for them to actually like havebabies, for instance, or keep them, or...

...it was not made for that at all. There are no social aspect of theplantation society when, where, in some places it's the case like in lettingAmerica or even the US, like, you had sort of like a social life around thePontitian that was in the case in Hili. So it's the reason. The reason why it'san island that is very important is because it's at the center ofeverything and it's used as an example, so by Mat, MalcolmSel. Now, because this is an island where a revolution happened tooverthrow capitalism, slavery, institutionalizedracism and then he also the the thing with theCaribbean. Is that also it's faced by an Enva, inver, ental English, becauseyou're at the center of basically like, like tornadoes it's like you're at the center ofeverything? Basically, so for me before, I think that I had an idea of like institutional is racism and everythingin the Caribbean, but I neglected the aspect of environment like it was forme. It's like doing this project was also like conciliating all the thingstogether and like just reviewing my way of thinking as welllike making it more like a three D. sixty thing let, unless like contract comportons, I guess that'swhat like this book has taught me as well. Okay, thank you all right so tonext. The next thing we're going to show it's a film by for one O, an extract from filmby canses out called. So you think the earth is a dead thing and my understandit's mainly shopped in in Martinique, sown up a number island, just yeah hundred and eighty cometes from fromGuadeloupe, where your research is mainly focused and then I like it comesup quite a lot so yeah, I think clary. When you're ready.We could play that an extract of that film. A woman stands in a field cuttingplants, JEFICO MICON NAP norm mode terial in only Monte. Your second do me Lekain it's a tinyabout. You. Do Care only obliged a voi reflexion onPuforatoai. You have near the site, pastil a mote in notorial bullies. Your faster is your first Agricol e, a opossums. I I in Reste a io this your first, a o e ally, go toJones, Peretola metal plus said patacoons, Yo, pardon and realparipatra is clas, so yeah I mean you can, can see thebetween that what sake? Oh, my God, okay, so we can see that the film Pasreally well with I, the Ma con fedia's...

...work kind of shows the ecological damage ofColani amongst ope things. But could you talk a little bit about yourinterest in the film? I think my interest in the Sam comesfrom the fact that so, as Laza comes from Yugoslavia, I don't know if we canstill say I don't know how, because they changedthe name of the country and I'm really bad a geography. But she comes from the Balkan basically,and she has made this movie called like onehundred and twenty five acres and basically also like she also in thismovie called the peasants like the about like like her her work is greatlyfocused on like agree, culture survival and also like criticalthinking and basically like it. I felt like shewas very, even though she doesn't come from like the Carben as well. I feellike the way that she linked the two together because alsolike her move other movies really interesting for that it was really clever, really smart andreally clear, and for me it's like the interest that I also had is thatthe movie is not solely about how we're suffering and how like how side it is. It's also about hearing, because in other parts, like the firstscene of the movie, opens on like a black woman in Martinique in her garden, basically talking about like everysingle plants, every single healing plants that she had in her garding anit's like a huge garden. Not It looks nothing, that's like what we have in our cities where it's like and sheis with a friend, and I think it's a really really really beautiful sceneand the reason why it's so beautiful it's because the title of movies, so you is so youthink earth is a dead thing reason its with what's happening inWetherup en martinique, which is basically like. Eighty to ninetypercent of the soil from this island is C, is poisoned with Claude can, whichis a pesticate that was used from the t. e s opens the mids, and this castic has had been forbidden inthe s like in the early s in the US, and we all know the US are not a greatexample of, like, I would say, just in in very terminis Mand just like ecology like this is probably like yeah we're not so the fact that they forbid the use of the past decide the four friends for me when I researchwas kind of odd, I'm not saying that France is more advanced or anything,but I'm just saying like there is. There is little to nine like food restriction in the US, likethey still could like corn syrup and everything that you eat. So it's like,I would expect friends to be a little more like saving when it comes to like the environment, you know, and it's notmetropolitan France. That's the thing, isn't it exactly so this is where itcomes into place that, for me, what I discovered is Motha. It was amilitat clate in France is that they were they were. They were aware of it like it wasn't something that theydidn't know like. They knew, but the reason why they gave a pass to the bigfirm to continue the use of this prison, even though in ninety eight N. eightythree, this woman is actually talking about the revolts, because in eightythree the farm is from wedlock already knew that the pesticate was not good,like he already felt, like my grandmother, was a farmer on these plantations as well, so she already knew it was bad like shealready knew it was. It was not something that came across as t asurprise or a big reveal. It's like the...

...their own health felt like already under attack and already like in jolbody, so they they demonstrated through several weeksseveral months in eighty three, that's what the women that's, what the womanis referring to. It's like she's, saying she's, trying to say that is aHusban as it has been a concern for almost like forty years in basicallylike an say and basic yeah. It's been a concern andyeah. I just tell I interline out thereyou've got kind of like if anyone's heard of the the Rangaroa Bok silen spring. It likea big book in America to a beginning of the environmentalmovement, and a lot of that was all about lanning and DDT, which is aPastesas, is really real base. I think understand the same thing to co,etcetera and that a one thousand nine hundred and seventy two and that sortof like the moment where America starts finding its own conscious aboutecological issues. Exactly when and then I oenas this year. Seventy twoseventy three. Seventy four was big, wake up pol years, except not well a minute, but also sentat the same time. That's when that I really start more stamaty really startUsin it and Matt Me Concretions, just just abson in like pushing you know,propines fished. It is recency between, like the West and the Caribbean, which isnot exactly considered the south as well, and this is what I want to talkabout with my text for the roots of evil that I'm going to read like anissue. It's there's this space of in between this, because these islands look likebeautiful these beautiful celeries. The people are so nice et ce et Suta likethere's a false misconception. Also that prevents like this postcard, this post part way of like seeing theCaribbean as also affected them greatly, because because you look for a certainway, people don't assume you're going through this through the same tri like tribulations as the south,which is Africa or asal or whatever, like yeah people assume that youbenefit from the same from the same benefits and also in ourcommunity in the black community. Even in France me being half African ofCaribbean, I can sense that there is kind of like purbeeahs n as they have like thisproximity to whiteness and this proximity to like the north and what itmeans like wealth and like in the in the in the collective consciousness. Ithink it's very ingrained, and I think this is also like how can I say that it's like apoisonous gift, because it's like you, have this image, but because you havethis image, people don't dig in. They know that slavery happen there, butit's like because it didn't happen on the soil offriends. People o people do have a distance from it like they didn't evenrealize that really, like slavery, happen, I think it's the same thing forthe UK. Really it's like they don't, because it didn't happen on the UK soil.It happened in Jamaica. It happened in Barbados, it had been in Matinicusbecause the English people were there as well for several years. I think that there's this misconceptionthat it's okay- they don't have it as bad as Africans, and this is the worstthing ever like, because it's it prevents us from having like criticalconversation about these places, which are de places where sney happen. saverydidn't happen in Africa. It happened there, so it happened in the south ofthe US. It happened in South America and it had been largelyin the Caribbean. So I think that there's really like everything is made for us to not understand wo. Where are the...

...lens in the places where theseproblematic are actually or these topics are actually urging like? Whereis the emergency? The emergency is not necessarily where the media is tellingyou it is like. The emergency is not necessarilylike in Mallowe, because you see like kids like not having food CRA. It'sit's another thing, there's like Clinias, and there is also like intiebacks. It's a whole ream and I think that people have a hard timeunderstanding like the different, the urgent topic in different regimes. Theyall they. We have a tendency to just like I don't know, I think, silence. Caribbean voices aswell or just like exertive them like it's like it's trivialized greatly, andthis is why I think this work is important and this talk even isimportant because it's always it's mainly trivialized and I think thatit's, it has been also the main topic of murder by proxy as well. It's likehow can we break from the postcard image and fromthe full cor think on the subject of murder by proxy?If you want to you want to go into the roots of eviltext or yeah, I want. I would like to treat go straight into that: okay, yeah, a at yeah in twenty second, even a see we can to yeah, can read the textand then and yeah and then maybe talk about likethe project and maybe then listen to somemusic, exactly yeah. Whatever can talk yeah, we can quite have the context, so I think us and Oh okay, sorry I okay, I found it the roots of evil.Twenty twenty was a year of home coming and awakening for many, quite naturally,self isolation offer the opportunity to dive back into what constition mymusical DA, Caribbean, music and, most importantly, and sully in music. After fifteen years, I was going backto Wedel my island in attempt to trace my own sonig genealogy, all a red foring, my maternal minige,with a new an adult case. While I was there, I was studying theintricacy of traditional music for Woko, as well as its drumming its pallingrespond structure and, of course, the relations between voicing in work andWoko, and the the question of identity and memory. More than being the wagons oftraditions and the Chrinnicle of their time. I came to realize that Wolka wasprotest, music and resisted French politics of assimilation, work or a musical ron that emerged inthe seventeenth century during the transactin. I slave trade at that time,African place from God of whether you use together to play drums singingthence. The use of any kind of drum was at that time, Sobede by the CUDNA. SoI'm going out of the text a little bit like when they were using drums anddancing. It was generally met with punishment. As a consequence, leve used a vocaltechnique. All bouled Lagel, which IMITA drums work up hates, wasdirectly in to recurl work, especially sugar cane coffee and bananacultivations. In a way listening to work at drummers and figures was a wayfor me to fully witness Antillian people re connecting with theirancestry in real time as someone who's the product of both African and Toanparents, it selt like a sweting and deep sunning expance. Not only werethey recollecting with the long lost place, the protecting woke remains alsoheavily attached to the old, the earth and the roots. Lucana was a decree passed by friendsking because in T E H S sixteen and eightyfive, this could defended condition of slavery in French Cona Empire. The gistof the code remain in place until at into night. Eighteen. Forty, eight sorry,...

...the Caribbean is an Anti Chamber of forin between this. At the center of a triple Abbes experience rot right,Canalis, the AD is opened up by the violent enslavement, the illusion ofabolition within the context of continued pulling all oppression. Theabyss of the middle passage were: do capture lay in the dark holes of sheeps,the worm of the Caribbean and the abyss of an remato English. The merchinenovelist act, poestion advocated for the multiplicity of cultural identitiesin an individual and borrows dollars and get aexpression of resum resumeth to expose the intricacy of the CREO identity. Zerezo is a plan that grows underground and has roots that entangles around others. However, the actualroots are Indian rotten. Although these islands are Christen anddream like landscapes, heaven is only surface level level. Would you leave in a land whose land ispoisoned for the next seven centuries, as Celia Pushan to control Banana William, so diconinstant testified was widely used between ninety seventy two in ninetyninety? Ninety three to protect ban, an AP plantation frominstant in Martini and neighboring Brad loop, with the complicity of the Frenchgovernment over ninety per cent of the Adolpe of Martinice, where loops sufferfrom cloudy composing. According to something to be fans. The French publichealth agency CLODION has been leaked to prostitute cancer, the rate of whichin Matinian, when Luke is amongst deist in the world, as well as Tomic andprince pancreatic tenser, the poisoning as also peent the soil and the water.In some important prices, these eight islands, the contamination, would couldlast to one from from one to six centuries in the environment. This information didn't come as asurprise, but I only realized this Kaloi when I saw my family experiencefirst hand on side, especially among women. Declarin ated pistacite is Wileyrecognized for its production of reproductive deficits on men, but itseffects on women is rarely discussed excessive fibroids past over latory deformities, as wellas high percentage of sober on death. How does the insulin women cultivate ahealthy relationship with her one, a one that has already lived through thetrogon systemic, a rape during slavery and now the disc, the destructiveviolence of Cadichon in a forshay, modern capitalism? How to Survive Amansthe dying? Can one led a good life in a bad life asked Jim Butler. I obviouslyhave no defensive answer. This trip that was originally a research trip, bebecame even more transformative than I expected in the end. I was left withway more than the desire of creating a sunning body of work, discovering the political nature ofLuca of will capulet it stared. Its story telling component was on was onething, but thinking about the resources we have to preserve and resist was thereal highlight the necessity of a Ticuna ecology felt more urging thanever, while the French plantation owners on the Carben Island of Mattiehad their gardens laid out. Investor tap that size style their enslaveworkers continued the tradition of using mid snow wild herbs which ruinthe edge of the partry of abitation. The plans were known as the Megha EdgeLimites. Nowadays, the perch represent one of the sever resources to which thepeople of matinicus and ecological ravage closed by the use of pesticateunder bending appetitions, which cover a quarter of the men. Another form ofresistance is being led by farmers who are reclaiming up and coiret lands togrow indigenous vegetables gated by expect local knowledge and without anyindustrial past icide as a sound artist, the most important thing was learninghow to cultivate my own voting part of it through resisting my relationship tofel recording which took a new meaning for me after this trip, it is now aboutgiving space to necessary healing. Thank you is down. I love that image ofneeding too create your own, your on...

...cousin, your own tonic, Curtin Yeah.Thank you. It's on man, I wonder if we could, we could see some of the motory proxy projectand Miss Yeah. Definitely, should I share a screen yeah good forhim. Student, a screen Shar showing a web page for a video of running water.I can you see yes cool, so this is the first part of thewebsite, which is a vow that took in a se called bond which in English, actually means boiling like it's, but it's called boilingbecause there's literally hot bath in the city, it's in Gadeloo we pagegrowls down the text which is right out the beyond the text. You can you havelike a video of this Ben Cocasse, which is one of themost known bend in in goodloe matching because theyinvented a Ohara which is called Zook, which is very highly popular in, like friends, will so throughout theworld. I can also read the text at a rote. Live a life, live a good life,surrounded by nature, indulging in the dreams in heavily settings, ha thedream, or, shall I say, the marriage of many many people. Imagine orincanting islands with a Calido SCIP in their eyes is the environ elsewhere,the sweet escape in the form of spice market. I'm interacting your program tocome and say that Evan is in fact poison. There we finally exter livelovin lavish in so let it infests it penetrates, and it is here to stay nogood life possible where life itself is compromised. How can one leave a goodlife in a bad life, and I think that if I want to get into the project, it will be also good to maybe play the video before gettinginto the project as well. I think it's time to just play like oneor two things we have about just one ER, ten minutes: Okay, Oh my God. I yeah it's true. It'sreally! I'm like. I just feel like I've beenspeaking for ten minutes, but okay, so basically I will go into my selves just interrupting. So I guess the form of this is it's ait's a website, the son, this video exactly, but I just want to perfect and you're here so basically about this project. The MB was reallyto have like a whole about, but more like a fictional story, it oflike having like a documentary Extato, my cree Resende, already done. I wantedto build like a fictional story like big and basically like my boom.Come tripped with a loop which is which isvery like filled of boy but also very traumatic, and I think it o months toget over it at even during the residence yeah won at my best. But when I went back to wedded and then it Koerpers story, I e I was in that I was real close to winand we were little Wi kind of like, under wit, like onaisy. She underwent a lot of like hiscarriage as well as like the one babies like she had two of themand I think that's like my. It was kind of like a seat right on the family andmy mom. I would didn't share it with me...

...because he taught that it was haypersonal and I understand it, but it's like it's not really. All of a sudden, likethis whole clodian thing of like really real, and I think that before that like,unless because everyone has cancer now like the perspective of having cancer inquite like okay, like every like, you can get cancer anyway, like it feltlike something really like. No, I wouldn't say normal, but, likeexpected, you know, I did die for Pani ours in a way and it's like what is not expected in what is lessdiscust about this issue is that that women are encountering with their fertility in with their one I to- and I think, the so wrong and also being defenseless in front of like such Anton that leftreally like and they didn't excite ly. I'm just. I was sad, and I didn't go tothat. So I can't imagine how my cousin, a betise, has been wet for partner for more than ten years, so Malcolm Fatina, I we did talk at stakedas well. That is also available on line, and we talk greatly about. Like I mean you talk about like feminism andthe Interstitia, the interest I lent between feminism, it ecology, which islike Ecatomiti, and how like like the Black Woman, is at the center ofthat as well, because for in her way of conceiving, has beensubjected to so many Roma that it's really hard to conceive actually like black women arelike, for instance, like four times more likely to by while giving birth, and this issomething that I didn't know before going there like. It's like all of thisstuff that I'm talking about are really like. So good I got into when I went back home,musically o. How long were you that, for I was there for three weeks like amonth, yeah and basically like it's just really from my perspective, that Icontinued like writing about it. Right now, like most of the still that I'vewrote about a a Pax is road in French, except for like the two first pages.But the rest of the story is were in French, because I couldn't even read inEnglish right away, because it's a very natural. But the Inter story is about a young woman that has, that is a INDEmusician. Whoa Ho was surprising and she decided to go back to her rootsbecause she hasn't been in fifteen years and she feels kind of like out ofplace. And you know you haven't been a in fifteen years, so it feels kind.This feel kind of weird and she decides to indulge in. So the carnival like likegetting to know how the Carnival works and how the drummer works and stufflike this and she records stuff as well. But he also ends up like having vision, and he is basically like way more aware of what's going on, because sheis there like she can escape the reality of what's going on becasue tly,giving it through her family, because I used the basic the story of my cousinalso decline it in the story and she'sbasically going through this. It ship in this realization in gin like shemanaged to cultivate her on boarding and like creates sort of like a Gildwith other women, to cultivate your gardens and like be like getting bushes for women. With these were getting to this French,he has a lot of it. Ships since it...

...backs this is like a wos for but yeah about, like honing experiments like from me. I alsoit sure I would love to just like make us share it. Are you porting that there same for them every morning micates when coming up to time? Maybewe could just play out when we drive, so I t I'm advancing a little bit. Thank you, Cristel Massy Piston, okay.Well, I mean I could go on for hours because there's so much to say, I feel like we're just getting stented,but that's that's Gadso. All right thanks! Everyone for watching listeningwatching on the RECAB yeah, we'll have another event in amonth or so and yeah. I tried to find a way to continuethe conversation with Castell yeah. Thank you so much. Everyone.

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